KSFR

Ellen Lockyer

Ellen Lockyer started her radio career in the late 1980s in Alaska, after a stint at bush Alaska weekly newspapers, the Copper Valley Views and the Cordova Times. When the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Prince William Sound, Valdez Public Radio station KCHU needed a reporter, and Ellen picked up the microphone.

Since then, she has literally traveled the length of the state, from Attu to Eagle and from Barrow to Juneau, covering Alaska stories on the ground for the AK show, Alaska News Nightly, the Alaska Morning News and for Anchorage public radio station, KSKA.

She relocated to Santa Fe in early 2017, and is now a regular contributor to KSFR.

Ellen Lockyer looks at New Mexico's atomic history through two pivotal events that occurred on July 16: the Trinity nuclear bomb test in 1945, and the Church Rock uranium mine spill in 1979.

In part 1, Ellen interviews Susan Gordon of the Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment, as well as Teresita Kiana, a Church Rock community member, about the uranium spill.

The US government wants to crack down on the sale of fraudulent Native American artwork. The Senate Indian Affairs Committee held a field hearing in Santa Fe on Friday [July 7] with the aim of putting more teeth into the Indian Arts and Crafts Act [IACA].  KSFR reporter Ellen Lockyer has more.

 

 

From the cloud to the earth. Finally today we have an analog story about a tradition still flourishing in Cochiti Pueblo.  Drum-maker Arnold Herrera and his family are helping to preserve an ancient culture by keeping  the heart of the drum beating.  KSFR's Ellen Lockyer reports.

 

Ellen Lockyer on claims of mismanaged funds at the Navajo Housing Authority, after Sen. John McCain's office issued a report last week.

 

 

Ellen Lockyer

Last October, the U.S. Department of Energy announced a site near New Mexico’s eastern border was under consideration for the so-called Deep Borehole Field Test. That project would drill a hole three miles deep into the earth to explore the geology beneath and test the potential for future nuclear waste storage inside the borehole.

 Last Tuesday, a terse announcement from U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Lujan’s (D-NM) Tucumcari field office sparked relief among many residents of a ranching community near the New Mexico–Texas border. KSFR’s Ellen Lockyer has the story.