KSFR

Deborah Martinez

Deborah grew up in northern New Mexico (Chimayo and Los Alamos), and has had a long career in radio and television news across the US (Albuquerque, El Paso, Miami, San Francisco, San Jose and Santa Fe), picking up Associated Press and NM Broadcast Association awards along the way. She is also a professional actor, with co-starring roles in numerous TV shows (The Night Shift, Breaking Bad, Killer Women, In Plain Sight) and motion pictures (The Missing, Astronaut Farmer, Undocumented, The Resident). 

She is happy to be a part of the KSFR news team, and she welcomes your story ideas at dmartinez@ksfr.org.

Deborah Martinez

In the midst of a sweeping new federal education law and shrinking state revenues, Governor Susana Martinez's administration is asking for an increase in funding to fill desk jobs and expand Pre-K programs, among other priorities.  KSFR's Deborah Martinez has more details on the two-point-nine-billion dollar schools’ budget.

Several dozen small business owners from Santa Fe heard from their state legislators at a continental breakfast held at Quail Run this week.  The event was sponsored by the Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce, ahead of next month’s 30-day session of the New Mexico State Legislature. KSFR’s Deborah Martinez was there, and she brings us this report.

Filling up at the gasoline pumps these days puts a smile on a consumer’s face, but in New Mexico those lower fuel costs mean lower revenues, and a tighter state budget.  That’s the reality state lawmakers are facing as they start the process of formulating a six-point-two-billion-dollar spending plan for the upcoming fiscal year that begins next summer.  KSFR’s Deborah Martinez reports the state now expects 232-milliondollars  in new money as they head into the next Legislative session, down from estimates of 293-million in August.

 

Next week New Mexico Public Education Department Secretary Hannah Skandera will present her agency’s budget request for the coming year. One of the items within PED’s budget will be charter schools, which the state has been approving in increasing numbers over the past few years.  KSFR’s Deborah Martinez reports on some of the concerns about charters by education advocates and administrators in Santa Fe.

When Congress began debating the Affordable Care Act more than five years ago, 50-million Americans were uninsured.  Since then, according to the federal government, almost 16-and-a-half million of those people have enrolled.  KSFR’s Deborah Martinez reports that as the third year of enrollment gets underway, Santa Fe has added a help center on Rodeo Road, with experts eager to help more people signed up for health insurance coverage and avoid costly penalties.

 

A small number of Santa Feans donned winter coats to waive at veterans parading downtown yesterday.  As KSFR’s Deborah Martinez reports, some of those vets and their families had to leave a subsequent gathering at the Bataan Building before speeches began, because of a screeching fire alarm that interrupted the festivities.

Deborah Martinez


 

A new gauge has just been installed to measure the amount of water in the ground in the hills of La Cienega – the rural community just south of Santa Fe.  Residents have been clamoring for the gauge for decades, as they watched their unique spring-fed ditches, or Acequias, dwindle.  As KSFR’s Deborah Martinez reports, the state-funded, water-measuring tool symbolizes the struggle of northern New Mexico’s communities to balance tradition and growth.

In January of this year, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Mexican gray wolf an endangered species.  In doing so, the agency sought to revive the population that had dwindled to just a few animals left in the wildlands of the southwest.  On its website, the service notes, “Once common throughout portions of the southwestern US, the Mexican wolf was all but eliminated from the wild by the 1970s, when it began efforts to conserve the species.

  That smoke Santa Fe and surrounding communities have been breathing is the residual effect of this week’s prescribed burn in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.  That’s where one-half dozen local and foreign firefighting teams are joining forces to thin the forest surrounding Santa Fe’s watershed.  KSFR’s Deborah Martinez was at the watershed during the second day of the prescribed burn operation that involved aircraft to reduce the chance of catastrophic fires.

A climate vigil took place this afternoon in Santa Fe, in support of Pope Francis’s address to Congress this morning.  As KSFR’s Deborah Martinez reports, the vigil was sponsored and led by a coalition of faith-based and environmental groups. Deborah joined KSFR's At Noon hosts live on air from the St. Francis Cathedral downtown. 

This year marks the 50th anniversary of one of the country’s formative volunteer organizations known as VISTA, or Volunteers in Service to America.  For the dozens of VISTA volunteers in New Mexico, regrouping at one of the celebrations held here in Santa Fe on Wednesday, it was a chance to look back on how they’ve helped improve the lives of New Mexicans.  KSFR’s Deborah Martinez reports from the event that was hosted by famous author and former VISTA volunteer George RR Martin.

Secretary of State Dianna Duran pleaded not guilty to charges of fraud, embezzlement and misuse of campaign funds, among other counts in District court in Santa Fe today.  At the same time, legislators convened to begin the process of impeachment of the secretary of state. 

 

KSFR's Deborah Martinez attended the court hearing and the legislative meeting, and joined KSFR's At Noon hosts live on Tuesday.

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