David Marash

News Director

David Marash is a veteran television news correspondent. He was chief Washington anchor for the global news channel Al Jazeera English from 2006 to 2008. Prior to that, he spent 16 years as a correspondent for ABC News' Nightline, covering wars in the Balkans, the Middle East and Rwanda, and disasters from the tsunami in Indonesia, Sri Lanka and Thailand, to Hurricane Andrew in the United States, where he also did investigative reports on the spread of toxic asbestos from the W.R. Grace co. mine at Libby, MT, and General Motors’  failed Minority Dealership Program Before reporting for Nightline, Marash spent more than a decade in local news in New York and Washington, D.C. From 1985 to 1989, he was a news anchor for WRC-TV, Washington. He was an investigative reporter for WNBC-TV in New York and NBC Sports from 1983 to 1985. Marash anchored the news for WCBS-TV in New York from 1973 through 1978 AND in 1981 and 1982, when he also anchored and reported for an Emmy Award-winning investigative magazine Dave Marash Reporting.  Marash was a correspondent for ABC News’ 20/20 from 1978 to 1980, where he won the first of his 4 National Emmy Awards for his reporting on the Sandinista government of Nicaragua. He has published articles in The New York TimesThe Christian Science Monitor, The Columbia Journalism Review, The Carnegie Reporter, The Journalist, Washington Monthly, Ms. Magazine and TV Guide. He is a founding member, and past Chairman of the The Committee to Protect Journalists. Marash graduated from Williams College in 1964 and did graduate work at Rutgers University.  He currently blogs at http://davemarashsez.blogspot.com/.

Here and There with Dave Marash

Dave will interview respected journalists, analysts and newsmakers about the events they are actively covering.  His extended conversations will cover the headlines and the context behind them.  His questions will give you the perspective of an insider and a colleague: “Give us the look, smell, feel of where you are.  What is life like for the people there? How does covering this story affect you? How do you learn what you think you know?”  And the answers will tell you: what’s really going on, how things got that way, and whose interests are being served?

In 1973, True Magazine identified Dave as “A Reporter’s Reporter.”  It’s still true.