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Christopher Purvis Architect

Chanting "No More Cuts," Educators Rally at the Roundhouse

When public schools budgets in New Mexico were cut by $46-million dollars in last fall’s special legislative session, educators’ morale sank. Yesterday, though, dozens from around the state expressed a glimmer of hope, after a House committee approved a spending bill that would put some of that money back into the classroom. As KSFR’s Deborah Martinez reports, legislators vowed to support public education and the rallying cry, “no more cuts.” http://traffic.libsyn.com/ksfrnews/MartinezEd221.mp3

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Hannah Colton

Immigration in Santa Fe: Claudia's Story

Across the U.S., hundreds of people have been deported in the last week in immigration raids that President Trump called a keeping of his campaign promises. In Santa Fe, Mayor Javier Gonzalez previously vowed that the city will remain a so-called sanctuary city. But local advocates are going a step further. Last night a resolution to strengthen Santa Fe’s status as a “welcoming” community for immigrants cleared a major hurdle in the city Finance Committee. KSFR’s Hannah Colton has this look...

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Last week the Santa Fe Council on International Relations presented  a session titled “Islam in the Time of Trump” The keynote speaker was Salam Al Mar-EE-atti, who is President of the Muslim Public Affairs Council. While Al-Maryati has been controversial for some of his public statements about Israel he has also written forcefully on the question of anti Muslim rhetoric in the US. He wrote that that rhetoric "perpetuates an image to the rest of the world that the US has a restricted and unsophisticated worldview that does not consider nuances or the needs of ordinary citizens."

Christopher Purvis Architect

When public schools budgets in New Mexico were cut by $46-million dollars in last fall’s special legislative session, educators’ morale sank.  Yesterday, though, dozens from around the state expressed a glimmer of hope, after a House committee approved a spending bill that would put some of that money back into the classroom.  As KSFR’s Deborah Martinez reports, legislators vowed to support public education and the rallying cry, “no more cuts.”

The United States increased the amount of carbon pumped into the atmosphere every year over decades.  But emissions began to decline in 2007 with the great Recession.  That trend might have continued, because at the end of the Obama Administration last year, the Bureau of Land management enacted stiffer rules that require oil and gas companies to capture methane emissions on federal and tribal lands.  However, a U.S. House of Representatives Natural Resources Committee met in late January to discuss rolling back the venting and flaring rule.  House Joint Resolution 36 was sponsored by Rep.

Courtesy Maya Rommwatt with Mexican Wolves

More Mexican Gray Wolves are roaming the Southwest now than at any time since 1998 – the year that the federal government began trying to introduce the gray wolf in southwestern New Mexico and southeast Arizona. Findings by the US Fish and Wildlife Service that were released Friday documented 113 wolves in New Mexico and AZ compared to 97 the previous year.

The writer James Baldwin is has been dead for 30 years but his oratory ideas and anger have been brought back to life in I am Not Your Negro by Raoul Peck. Playing at the CCA Cinematheque. David D’Arcy has this review.

Courtesy of Jenni Monet

“Water protectors are everywhere.” Those words came this morning from Jenni Monet. Jenni Monet is a journalist from Laguna Pueblo who has been reporting on the water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock in Cannonball, ND since last September. I reached Jenni Monet this morning by telephone for breaking news and an update on her arrest of February 1st.

Jenni Monet said that the ND officials and the National Guard accelerating the protectors’ camp  evacuations intend to  moved 50 industrial dumpsters out of the main camps a day starting today.

Mayor Javier Gonzales delivered his State of the City address last night. Subjects covered included early childhood education, a raise for city employees, and Santa Fe's new resolution to be a "welcoming city" for immigrants.

Senator Cisco McSorley has had success in moving two of his bills through the NM Senate as the Legislature reaches the halfway mark of this year’s 60 day session. Sandra Fish reports.

Hannah Colton

Across the U.S., hundreds of people have been deported in the last week in immigration raids that President Trump called a keeping of his campaign promises.

In Santa Fe, Mayor Javier Gonzalez previously vowed that the city will remain a so-called sanctuary city. But local advocates are going a step further. Last night a resolution to strengthen Santa Fe’s status as a “welcoming” community for immigrants cleared a major hurdle in the city Finance Committee. 

Yesterday, a federal judge denied the Standing Rock and Cheyenne Sioux Tribes’ injunction against President Trump’s move last week to fast-track approval for completing the Dakota Access Pipeline. The ruling means few legal moves remain for those protesting the pipeline, although many have vowed to stay at Standing Rock and continue their opposition. This morning, I spoke to Santa Fe attorney Jeffrey Haas who has represented members of the protest movement.

 

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Effective Activism Series

Effective Activism: Conversations with Writers

With this news feature we launch a continuation, with a twist, of our Effective Activism series that we’ll be continuing over the first one hundred days of the Donald J. Trump presidency. Melissa Chadburn was formerly a union organizer with SEIU, the Service Employees International Union that represents 1.5 million public service workers including hospital staff, nurses, building service providers and security guards. She has written for Guernica, Buzzfeed, Jezebel, American Public Media’s...

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Dave Marash

Here and There with Dave Marash

This week on HERE and THERE

MONDAY Feb. 20 - Shortly after Donald Trump started his Presidency, the market for dystopian fiction went crazy. George Orwell’s 1984 shot to the top of Amazon’s best-seller list, with the American classic It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis close behind. UNM English Professor Gary Scharnhorst talks about these literary warnings against totalitarian political takeovers. TUESDAY Feb. 21 - Today’s political battlefield for hearts and minds has shifted to the internet, and the US military has...

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